[Frontiers in Bioscience 10, 3009-3012, September 1, 2005]

TECHNICAL NOTE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL INTRACISTERNAL PENICILLIN SEIZURE MODEL IN THE RAT

Ravish V. Patwardhan 1, John W. Calvert 1, Walter Besio 2, Gen Kusaka 1, Ikuyo Kusaka 1, John Zhang 1, and Anil Nanda 1

1 Department of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University - Shreveport, Shreveport, Louisiana, 2 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Abstract
2. Introduction
3. Materials and Methods
4. Results and Discussion
4.1. Seizure Model
4.2. Advantages of Intracisternal vs. Intraperitoneal or Intravenous Use
4.3. Difficulties of Intracisternal vs. Intraperitoneal or Intravenous Use
5. Summary
6. Acknowledgments
7. References

1. ABSTRACT

In order to develop an intracisternal penicillin rat model of epilepsy, eleven anesthetized male Wistar rats were studied. 5 underwent intracisternal injection of penicillin (doses 150,000-300,000 units) in the prone position, and another 5 underwent intraperitoneal penicillin injection; one died following intracisternal injection, prior to further study. Time between penicillin injection and seizure induction (determined by electroencephalography) was recorded. Each animal had a tracheostomy, and was mechanically ventilated and carefully monitored for adverse effects. Seizures were noted in an average of 13:42 minutes following penicillin injection (range 4:30-23:20) for the intracisternally (IC) injected group. Both episodic and continuous seizure activity was seen, and a dose-dependent effect was seen (quicker-onset, more continuous seizures with higher doses, in the IC group). Onset was significantly faster in the IC than for the intraperitoneally injected group (all >1 hour for the latter group in our study). 96 total separate seizure episodes were seen, ranging from 3 to 540 seconds. Epileptic activity could be seen in all IC-injected rats lasting over 1 hour into the study. The intracisternal penicillin injection rat model appears to provide a quick-onset, reliable method of inducing seizure activity in the rat model while leaving the cranial vault intact.